P h o t o B l o g

Tuesday, 17 August 2010

Egret Mill


(Click photo for larger version. Press Back button to return here.)

"E" is for "Egret Mill" and today's photo shows the frontage of the former Egret Mill on Old Street, Ashton.

Egret Mill was built on the corner of Old Street and Bentinck Street in Ashton. It was opened in 1823 as Lees Mill, a five-storey spinning mill. It was later bought by the Egret Mill Company, who added weaving sheds to the site.

In 1881 the original spinning mill was destroyed by fire and the weaving sheds were then extended over the site. However, the mill ceased cotton cloth manufacturing in 1887.

The part of the building seen in the photo accommodated the mill offices. Behind that there are just two bays surviving of the weaving shed. There is nothing left of the rest of the mill.

This part of Old Street is being re-developed as part of the St Petersfield scheme. In the background, further along the street, can be seen The Witchwood pub and The Armoury.

See Birds Eye View of this location.

See Google Street View of this location.

"Egret Mill" is a contribution to ABC Wednesday. For more "E" posts from around the world please follow this link.

10 comments:

  1. a very beautiful photograph :) and informative post..!

    My ABC W E

    ReplyDelete
  2. Love this old building.

    ROG, ABC Wednesday team

    ReplyDelete
  3. Wonderful history - there are so few spinning and weaving mills left.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is a beautiful old building! Thank´s for showing us...
    Annelie E
    ABC Wednesday Team

    ReplyDelete
  5. interesting post ... beautiful architecture too..
    My ABC Wednesday here

    ReplyDelete
  6. In the 1911 census an ancestor of mine, Ellen Harding, born 1885 in Ashton-Under-Lyne, was domestic cook at Egret House which was next door to Egret Mill. Ellen emigrated to Canada- on board the SS Crefeld June 1913. Her last known address was Somerset Hotel, Church St Toronto. (Taken from her father's attestation record when he signed up for the Canadian Expeditionary Force in WW1- subtracting 10 years from his real age!))

    ReplyDelete
  7. This is a beautiful building and a great E post. I was hoping for photos of egrets when I saw the title but this works really wonderfully.

    ReplyDelete

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